Wood Species

Bildau & Bussmann is an Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) Certified company, this means that the supply chain of wood is managed responsibly, complying with environmental, social and economic standards set by FSC. This covers much more than trees, it also ensures that local communities are respected, that habitats of endangered species are protected and that workers receive fair compensation.

Eco Supply offers 4 wood species from Bildau & Bussmann, each selected for it’s standing in the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) as well as the International Union for Conservation of Natures (IUCN): European Pine, European Spruce, Siberian Larch, and White Oak.

European Pine

European Pine, or Pinus Nigra, is the most commonly used wood for windows and doors in Europe. European Pine is not listed in the CITES Index and is reported by as a species of least concern. Because of these considerations, European Pine used by Bildau & Bussmann is always FSB certified, sourced from Poland, and is the most economic option.

The wood of European Pine is moderately hard and straight-grained, it contains medium sized resin canals, that are numerous and evenly distributed. Pinus Nigra is easy to work with by hand, machine tools, and has a nice finish.

We advise using pine in less transited areas, such as residences, or in combination with exterior aluminum cladding.

European Spruce

European Spruce, or Picea Abies, is the classic “Christmas Tree” used throughout Europe and North America. European Spruce is not listed in the CITES Index and is reported by IUCN as a species of least concern. Bildau & Bussmann can source FSB certified European Spruce upon request.

The wood of European Spruce is the least dense of our options, which reduces thermo-conductivity in windows and doors. Due to its low density, the wood is soft and malleable. European Spruce has a fine, even texture, and a consistently straight grain.

We advise using spruce in less transited areas, such as residences, or in combination with exterior aluminum cladding, especially when aiming for very low u-values.

Siberian Larch

Siberian Larch, or Larix Sirbica, is one of three species of Larch wood found throughout Siberia. Larix Sirbica grows in the forests that border Finland on the east, through the Yenisei Valley in central Siberia. Siberian Larch is not listed in the CITES Index, and it is Bildau & Bussmann wood of choice. Bildau & Bussmann has a Siberian Larch extracting and milling operation which provides direct access to raw wood, allowing for highly competitive prices in large units. Bildau & Bussmann can source FSB certified Larch upon request.

The wood of Siberian Larch wears the best, surpassing Mahogany in its resistance to weather conditions. Due to its strength, it acts as a hard wood and it is long lasting. Siberian Larch is a light wood that, if desired, can be let exposed to gray over time.

We advise using Larch in high-transit areas, such as schools, offices, or institutional buildings.

White Oak

White Oak, or Quercus Robur, can be found to grow throughout Europe. As with all the other species, White Oak Spruce is not listed in the CITES Index and is reported by IUCN as a species of least concern. Bildau & Bussmann sources White Oak from forests in Germany and Russia and can source FSC certified Oak upon request.

White Oak has a straight grain, with a coarse and varying texture due to its slow growth. White Oak produces great results with hand and machine tools and responds well to steam bending. It has a consistent and beautiful reaction to clear and colored stains.

White Oak is the strongest wood species offered by Bildau & Bussmann, and it is mostly used in monumental windows and doors. White Oak can hold heavy weights, such as those by large expanses of glass, without warping over time.

See the chart below for cost, insulation, and weatherability comparison:

Wood Species Weather Resistance Insulating Value Price
Siberian Larch $$
European Pine $
European Spruce $
European Meranti $$$
White Oak $$$$

Still haven't found what you're looking for?